“On Revolution Roads” exhibition tour – Križevci

EXHIBITION On Revolution Roads – Memorial Tourism in Yugoslavia
Friday | 17. March 2017 | 20:00 | Klub kulture Križevci 

Hosts: Nikola Ostojčić, Luka Baričević, Jelka Vukobratović
Guest: Lana Lovrenčić (Inappropriate Monuments, SF:ius)

The exhibition is a collective product of all the (In)approproate Monuments platform members. It developed from the research of memorial heritage, its management and  the question of its meaning today. The research focused on the attempts to develop memorial tourism in socialist Yugoslavia in which the monuments on PLS played very important role. Authors of the concept are Lana Lovrenčić and Milan Rakita. For this occasion, research team from the P.O.I.N.T. will give an overwiev of PLS monuments in area near Križevci.

The exhibition is organized by non-profit organization P.O.I.N.T as a part of Culture Shock Festival. Croatian tour of an exhibition is organized in cooperation with  Savez udruga Klubtura /  Clubture Network.

See you in Križevci!

WAR, REVOLUTION AND MEMORY: Post-War Monuments in Post-Communist Europe

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
WAR, REVOLUTION AND MEMORY: Post-War Monuments in Post-Communist Europe
RAT, REVOLUCIJA I SJEĆANJE: Poratni spomenici u post-komunističkoj Europi

17 – 18 February 2017
Mimara Museum
Roosevelt Square 5, Zagreb, Croatia

World War II caused a collective trauma in the memory of Europeans, which resulted in the erection of countless monuments all over Europe to commemorate the events and battles as well as the civilian and military victims. In the period of almost 45 years, numerous memorial sites were created in the Communist Europe. Contrary to the dominant belief that the monuments in the Eastern Bloc and Non-aligned Yugoslavia were created exclusively in the spirit of Socialist Realism and erected by order of state authorities, typologically and stylistically these monuments form a heterogeneous group, and were erected both by the state and the local communities.

The decline of Communism and the introduction of the market economy and multi-party system in the newly emerged countries resulted in multiple effects, both on the institutional and symbolic level. On the institutional and legislative level, it brought significant changes within the legal framework, functioning of institutions and civil services of the post-socialist countries. On the symbolic level this led to rejection of the bearers of symbolic capital of the former system.

Taking into account the scope of this heritage, the efforts invested in rediscovery, protection and conservation treatment of memorials require significant funds. But before raising the question of funding, one should ask if and for whom this disputed heritage should be restored? In what ways did the change of political paradigm make these monuments undesirable in the post-socialist countries? Have processes of denial and suppression contributed to the cancellation of an inherent ideological charge of these monuments? If so, are we allowed to treat them exclusively as aesthetic objects, particularly when they are preserved in fragments? Should these monuments, as relics of a forgotten past, be seen as a part of the tourism industry? Could the damaged or destroyed artefacts be restored to their original state or should the conservation treatment also commemorate the period of denial and suppression? What is the role of heritage communities in relation to survival and revival of this heritage?

The conference will present 23 lectures by European and USA researchers and experts.
The official language of the conference is English. The entrance is free.

thumbnail of blok-wb

War, Revolution, Memory – program book 

The conference is organised by NGO SF:ius – Social Fringe: interesting untold stories in cooperation with ICOMOS Croatia as a part of the international project (IN)APPROPRIATE MONUMENTS.

Icomosicomosdva kao loga

The conference is funded by the Allianz Cultural Foundation, Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Croatia and Balkan Arts and Culture Fund – BAC. BAC is supported by the Swiss Government through the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) and the European Cultural Foundation (ECF)

BAC is supported by the Swiss Government through the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) and the European Cultural Foundation (ECF)

CALL FOR PAPERS “War, Revolution and Memory: Post-War Monuments in Post-Communist Europe”

CALL FOR PAPERS
International conference
War, Revolution and Memory: Post-War Monuments in Post-Communist Europe
Zagreb, February 17-18, 2017

Tjentište, Sutjeska. © Sandro Đukić

Tjentište, Sutjeska. © Sandro Đukić

World War II caused a collective trauma in the memory of Europeans, which resulted in the erection of countless monuments all over Europe to commemorate the events and battles as well as the civilian and military victims. In the period of almost 45 years, numerous memorial sites were created in the Communist Europe. Contrary to the dominant belief that the monuments in the Eastern Bloc and Non-aligned Yugoslavia were created exclusively in the spirit of Socialist Realism and erected by order of state authorities, typologically and stylistically these monuments form a heterogeneous group, and were erected both by the state and the local communities.

Since their creation, and due to the fact that they were conceived as “intentional monuments“ (in the sense of Riegl’s gewollte Denkmale), a number of governmental regulations have been adopted in order to ensure that this heritage is adequately protected and maintained.

The decline of Communism and the introduction of the market economy and multi-party system in the newly emerged countries resulted in multiple effects, both on the institutional and symbolic level. On the institutional and legislative level, it brought significant changes within the legal framework, functioning of institutions and civil services of the post-socialist countries. On the symbolic level this led to rejection of the bearers of symbolic capital of the former system.

Therefore, the perception of monuments created in the period of Real Socialism to commemorate World War II was rapidly changing, and the meaning they conveyed, as well as their memorial and aesthetic value were being questioned, challenged and/or denied. Often violent, break with the former regime resulted in their relocation, temporary or permanent removal from the public space and vandalism or destruction. Norbert Huse tried to define these phenomena by devising the category of uncomfortable architectural monuments (unbequeme Baudenkmale). Twenty-seven years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, we are still witnessing the denial, destruction and marginalization of these monuments as unacceptable, unsightly, totalitarian, etc.

The attempts to revaluate this heritage, as well as to develop different strategies of its public presentation, differ from state to state, and the criteria and guidelines that should be used to devise a “new“ perception, followed by the management and maintenance of the denied monuments, mainly depend on the political and economic situation in different countries.

Taking into account the scope of this heritage, the efforts invested in rediscovery, protection and conservation treatment of memorials require significant funds. But before raising the question of funding, one should ask if and for whom this disputed heritage should be restored? In what ways did the change of political paradigm make these monuments undesirable in the post-socialist countries? Have processes of denial and suppression contributed to the cancellation of an inherent ideological charge of these monuments? If so, are we allowed to treat them exclusively as aesthetic objects, particularly when they are preserved in fragments? Should these monuments, as relics of a forgotten past, be seen as a part of the tourism industry? Could the damaged or destroyed artefacts be restored to their original state or should the conservation treatment also commemorate the period of denial and suppression? What is the role of heritage communities in relation to survival and revival of this heritage?

These questions will be discussed at an international conference in the following sessions:

1) MONUMENT PROTECTION AND TRANSITION: preservation of World War II monuments in the former Eastern Bloc and Yugoslavia and the impact of recent political history on the reception of monuments (revaluation processes, historical revisionism and perception, memorial and aesthetic evaluation)

2) PRACTICE OF PROTECTION AND CHANGES TO THE LEGAL AND INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK: legislative changes and their impact on the issues of jurisdiction and management, ownership, etc. (role of management in the processes of rediscovery, research and conservation)

3) EXAMPLES OF MANAGEMENT: the models of managing monuments and memorial complexes, good and bad practices, socialist heritage and tourism

4) CONSERVATION: the problems of maintenance, interpretation and representation of World War II monuments, use of traditional methodologies within a changed system of values.

The conference is organised by NGO SF:ius – Social Fringe: interesting untold stories in cooperation with ICOMOS Croatia as a part of the international project INAPPROPRIATE MONUMENTS.
The official language of the conference is English.
The conference organizers will subsidize the cost of accommodation for non-Zagreb participants.

Please submit 500-word abstracts and a short bio (in English) to sfius@sfius.org by November 1st 2016. The successful participants will be notified by November 15th.

Icomosicomosdva kao loga

“On Revolution Roads” exhibition opening in Ljubljana

Habicht

Tanja Lažetić z Dejan Habicht, Pot spominov in tovarištva (PST, 100 fotografij, 2001; Ni spominov, ni tovarištva, 2006, video, 5′; Spominski kamni, 94 fotografij , 2008; Rdeče zvezde, fotografije in besedilo, 2008)

Moderna Galerija, Ljubljana, 18.6.2016. – 28.6.2016. 

The introduction of memorial tourism as a segment of tourism in socialist Yugoslavia is still an unresearched postwar phenomenon of the development of Yugoslav tourism that most definitely influenced the overall reception of Yugoslavia’s memorial and other heritage, especially its artistic, architectural, and urban-planning achievements. The introduction of monuments and memorial objects of the national liberation front as a product for tourists and the following commercialization of the symbolic as well as the historical and political dimensions of monuments dedicated to the national liberation struggle  impacted the mechanisms of monument protection and the management of then already existing monuments, including the concepts for future monuments to the liberation struggle and the different modes of their financing. The expression “memorial tourism” should be taken with a grain of salt//some reservation since it emphasizes the commercial function of the monuments to the socialist liberation struggle as their predominant trait, thereby ignoring the complexity of their historical-political background and their symbolic, social and political functions. This is precisely what the artists that joined this exhibition show us: all the different sides of dealing with what was once our common or shared heritage, both artistically and politically. Their questions and answers range from socialism to capitalism, revisionism, oblivion and/or the compulsion to remember, and even towards such supposedly simple things as sightseeing, traveling, the agony of waiting, etc. This exhibition has already been on view in Zagreb, Sarajevo, Kraljevo, and Belgrade. It is the first result produced by the partners joined in the international project Inappropriate Monuments and their outside collaborators.

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The two-year international project Inappropriate Monuments will finish in 2017 with an exhibition dedicated to Slovenian monuments of the national liberation struggle. The exhibition will be prepared in collaboration with art history students from the Faculty of Arts in Ljubljana.

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Concept: Lana Lovrenčić, Milan Rakita

Organisation of traveling exhibition: Marko Jenko

Researchers: Tamara Buble (SF:ius), Barbara Drole, Jelena Grbić (GA), Elma Hodžić (HM BiH), Marko Jenko (MG+MSUM), Goran Janev (Levičarski Pokret Solidarnost, Skopje), Jelica Jovanović (GA), Mateja Kuka (SF:ius), Nenad Lajbenšperger, Nikola Puharić (SF:ius), Vladana Putnik

Participating artists: Dušica Dražić (http://www.dusicadrazic.com), Igor Grubić, Dejan Habicht, Siniša Labrović, Tanja Lažetić (http://www.lazetic.si)

Acknowledgements: Dejan Habicht, Janez Kramžar, Tanja Lažetić, Borko Radešček, Martina Vovk

Design: Oleg Šuran

 

Project partners: SF:ius – Socijalni rub: zanimljive neispričane priče (Zagreb), Grupa arhitekata (Belgrade), Moderna galerija MG+MSUM (Ljubljana), Historijski muzej BiH (Sarajevo)