Kaitlyn Miklovich: Zagreb Spring School “Context Matters” Review

Zagreb Spring School: Context Matters | April 28 – May 3 2017

Zagreb Spring School opened April 28th with six architecture students in attendance: 3 each from University of Detroit Mercy and University of Zagreb. It began with a historical context lecture by Josip Jagić on Yugoslavia in WWII. It gave the American students a brief glimpse into the past of the prior state. Moving on there were lectures on the Development of Memorials and Monuments between 1940 and 1960, Development of Memorial Areas & Parks and lastly The Destruction of Partisan Monuments. The lectures flowed into each other, speaking first to how there was to be 6000 monuments erected in Croatia between 1946-1965 and how there were different periods, such as abstraction of the monuments. Secondly about how the communities financed their own monuments and what they stood for–for the future and not just a place to lay flowers. Monuments grew in their functions as well, adding things so that people would stay, such as libraries, theaters and hotels. The last lecture expressed the downfall of the monuments beginning in 1991, where 3000 monuments were destroyed by many forces, and a Typology of Deterioration arose. Ending the first day were two workshops with Erika Lindsay, a photography workshop on the different rules and tips of placement of subject and balance, as well as settings and what they affect, then a graphics workshop sowing the many principles of design.

Zagreb. © Kaitlyn Miklovich

Saturday included two tours, the first half of the day was spent at The Memorial Park Dotrščina, followed by lunch, then a tour of Zagreb’s City Center. We learned a lot about the different meanings the abstract, crystal forms in The Memorial Park Dotrščina took on and their significance at the time they were built. Additionally, we learned about the history of the city center and its specific construction.

Dotrščina, Zagreb. © Kaitlyn Miklovich

Sunday, we had group discussions over readings pertaining to monuments and the different emotions they evoke. We read: The Role of the Counter-Monument Movement in Germany’s Collective Memory, How Societies Remember, Reflections on Urbanism, Monument, Territory and the Mediation of War Memory in Socialist Yugoslavia, Between Memory and History and Memorijali Revolucije. These readings sparked deep conversation about many monuments, both standing and demolished

Monday and Tuesday were the two biggest days, the first including the tour of Petrova Gora, both to the Partisan Hospital and Vojin Bakic’s monument. They were equally just as amazing, the history and need for the Partisan Hospital and its surrounding buildings, and the monument itself architecturally grand in its own way, they are mutually important to the people, past and present. Tuesday began with a presentation of a project: Festivalization of a Neighborhood and Anti-gentrification Insights by Dafne Berc, Bojan Mucko and Dino Belamarić. After that we went straight to work in international pairs on our projects and presentations on our choice of revitalization projects for Vojin Bakic’s monument to successfully end the workshop.

Petrova gora, monument. © Kaitlyn Miklovich

Partisan hospital at Petrova gora. © Kaitlyn Miklovich

Inside Petrova gora memorial. © Kaitlyn Miklovich

„Context matters“: international spring school of architecture and urban planning Zagreb, open call for students – deadline extended to April 24th

 „Context matters“: international spring school of architecture and urban planning

Zagreb, April 28 – May 3 2017

Dear students,

In cooperation with the School of Architecture University of Detroit Mercy, SF:ius (Social Fringe: interesting untold stories, www.sfius.org), is organizing a student workshop „Context matters“ from April 28th to May 3rd 2017. The workshop focuses on the (re)contextualization of undesirable socialist heritage, along with rethinking the conservation, survival and revival of those forgotten places.

Combining lectures with field trips and practical work the workshop provides a unique intensive course in urban planning and memorial architecture of socialism. It will include site visits to Petrova gora, Spomen-park Dotrščina with other Zagreb city memorial sites. In the course of the workshop, students will have the opportunity to produce their own design projects in international teams, suggesting possible revival or conservational solutions for the visited sites and present their final work publicly.

Workshops on photography, diagramming, site analysis and graphics/visualizing data will be organized by Assistant professor Erika Lindsay from the School of Architecture, University Detroit Mercy.

The program also provides lectures about socio-political context, historical context, social heritage in post-socialist context and conservation, held by SF:ius members, in collaboration with other experts.

The call is open to students of architecture and design. If you’re interested in applying, please send your CV and a letter of intent in English to the following address: sfius@sfius.org with a subject “context matters: application 2017”.

Your CV should not be more than one page long and your letter of intent not longer than 500 words.

Aplication deadline is April 20th 2017. For additional information or questions, feel free to contact us. Application deadline has been extended to April 24th, 12:00 CET.

Looking forward to having you on our workshop team!

 

Erika Lindsay is founder of a media-infused research and design practice which embraces collaboration and curiosity through creating at many scales. Her recent work, documents the reappropriation of monuments in former Yugoslavia as part of her ongoing research into memorial elasticity. She studied at the University of Michigan where she earned a master of architecture and master of science in critical conservation. Lindsay holds a bachelor’s degree in fine arts with a concentration in digital cinema from the College for Creative Studies in Detroit. An assistant professor of Architecture at the University of Detroit Mercy, she is currently teaching a design studio focused on architectural conservation and adaptive reuse of difficult heritage as an exchange professor at the Warsaw University of Technology.

Download workshop schedule.

WAR, REVOLUTION AND MEMORY: Post-War Monuments in Post-Communist Europe

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
WAR, REVOLUTION AND MEMORY: Post-War Monuments in Post-Communist Europe
RAT, REVOLUCIJA I SJEĆANJE: Poratni spomenici u post-komunističkoj Europi

17 – 18 February 2017
Mimara Museum
Roosevelt Square 5, Zagreb, Croatia

World War II caused a collective trauma in the memory of Europeans, which resulted in the erection of countless monuments all over Europe to commemorate the events and battles as well as the civilian and military victims. In the period of almost 45 years, numerous memorial sites were created in the Communist Europe. Contrary to the dominant belief that the monuments in the Eastern Bloc and Non-aligned Yugoslavia were created exclusively in the spirit of Socialist Realism and erected by order of state authorities, typologically and stylistically these monuments form a heterogeneous group, and were erected both by the state and the local communities.

The decline of Communism and the introduction of the market economy and multi-party system in the newly emerged countries resulted in multiple effects, both on the institutional and symbolic level. On the institutional and legislative level, it brought significant changes within the legal framework, functioning of institutions and civil services of the post-socialist countries. On the symbolic level this led to rejection of the bearers of symbolic capital of the former system.

Taking into account the scope of this heritage, the efforts invested in rediscovery, protection and conservation treatment of memorials require significant funds. But before raising the question of funding, one should ask if and for whom this disputed heritage should be restored? In what ways did the change of political paradigm make these monuments undesirable in the post-socialist countries? Have processes of denial and suppression contributed to the cancellation of an inherent ideological charge of these monuments? If so, are we allowed to treat them exclusively as aesthetic objects, particularly when they are preserved in fragments? Should these monuments, as relics of a forgotten past, be seen as a part of the tourism industry? Could the damaged or destroyed artefacts be restored to their original state or should the conservation treatment also commemorate the period of denial and suppression? What is the role of heritage communities in relation to survival and revival of this heritage?

The conference will present 23 lectures by European and USA researchers and experts.
The official language of the conference is English. The entrance is free.

thumbnail of blok-wb

War, Revolution, Memory – program book 

The conference is organised by NGO SF:ius – Social Fringe: interesting untold stories in cooperation with ICOMOS Croatia as a part of the international project (IN)APPROPRIATE MONUMENTS.

Icomosicomosdva kao loga

The conference is funded by the Allianz Cultural Foundation, Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Croatia and Balkan Arts and Culture Fund – BAC. BAC is supported by the Swiss Government through the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) and the European Cultural Foundation (ECF)

BAC is supported by the Swiss Government through the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) and the European Cultural Foundation (ECF)

CALL FOR PAPERS “War, Revolution and Memory: Post-War Monuments in Post-Communist Europe”

CALL FOR PAPERS
International conference
War, Revolution and Memory: Post-War Monuments in Post-Communist Europe
Zagreb, February 17-18, 2017

Tjentište, Sutjeska. © Sandro Đukić

Tjentište, Sutjeska. © Sandro Đukić

World War II caused a collective trauma in the memory of Europeans, which resulted in the erection of countless monuments all over Europe to commemorate the events and battles as well as the civilian and military victims. In the period of almost 45 years, numerous memorial sites were created in the Communist Europe. Contrary to the dominant belief that the monuments in the Eastern Bloc and Non-aligned Yugoslavia were created exclusively in the spirit of Socialist Realism and erected by order of state authorities, typologically and stylistically these monuments form a heterogeneous group, and were erected both by the state and the local communities.

Since their creation, and due to the fact that they were conceived as “intentional monuments“ (in the sense of Riegl’s gewollte Denkmale), a number of governmental regulations have been adopted in order to ensure that this heritage is adequately protected and maintained.

The decline of Communism and the introduction of the market economy and multi-party system in the newly emerged countries resulted in multiple effects, both on the institutional and symbolic level. On the institutional and legislative level, it brought significant changes within the legal framework, functioning of institutions and civil services of the post-socialist countries. On the symbolic level this led to rejection of the bearers of symbolic capital of the former system.

Therefore, the perception of monuments created in the period of Real Socialism to commemorate World War II was rapidly changing, and the meaning they conveyed, as well as their memorial and aesthetic value were being questioned, challenged and/or denied. Often violent, break with the former regime resulted in their relocation, temporary or permanent removal from the public space and vandalism or destruction. Norbert Huse tried to define these phenomena by devising the category of uncomfortable architectural monuments (unbequeme Baudenkmale). Twenty-seven years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, we are still witnessing the denial, destruction and marginalization of these monuments as unacceptable, unsightly, totalitarian, etc.

The attempts to revaluate this heritage, as well as to develop different strategies of its public presentation, differ from state to state, and the criteria and guidelines that should be used to devise a “new“ perception, followed by the management and maintenance of the denied monuments, mainly depend on the political and economic situation in different countries.

Taking into account the scope of this heritage, the efforts invested in rediscovery, protection and conservation treatment of memorials require significant funds. But before raising the question of funding, one should ask if and for whom this disputed heritage should be restored? In what ways did the change of political paradigm make these monuments undesirable in the post-socialist countries? Have processes of denial and suppression contributed to the cancellation of an inherent ideological charge of these monuments? If so, are we allowed to treat them exclusively as aesthetic objects, particularly when they are preserved in fragments? Should these monuments, as relics of a forgotten past, be seen as a part of the tourism industry? Could the damaged or destroyed artefacts be restored to their original state or should the conservation treatment also commemorate the period of denial and suppression? What is the role of heritage communities in relation to survival and revival of this heritage?

These questions will be discussed at an international conference in the following sessions:

1) MONUMENT PROTECTION AND TRANSITION: preservation of World War II monuments in the former Eastern Bloc and Yugoslavia and the impact of recent political history on the reception of monuments (revaluation processes, historical revisionism and perception, memorial and aesthetic evaluation)

2) PRACTICE OF PROTECTION AND CHANGES TO THE LEGAL AND INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK: legislative changes and their impact on the issues of jurisdiction and management, ownership, etc. (role of management in the processes of rediscovery, research and conservation)

3) EXAMPLES OF MANAGEMENT: the models of managing monuments and memorial complexes, good and bad practices, socialist heritage and tourism

4) CONSERVATION: the problems of maintenance, interpretation and representation of World War II monuments, use of traditional methodologies within a changed system of values.

The conference is organised by NGO SF:ius – Social Fringe: interesting untold stories in cooperation with ICOMOS Croatia as a part of the international project INAPPROPRIATE MONUMENTS.
The official language of the conference is English.
The conference organizers will subsidize the cost of accommodation for non-Zagreb participants.

Please submit 500-word abstracts and a short bio (in English) to sfius@sfius.org by November 1st 2016. The successful participants will be notified by November 15th.

Icomosicomosdva kao loga